Advising to Graduation | ACPA

Three times a year, the Graduation Team in the Registrar’s Office sends several hundred emails informing students that they did not meet the requirements for graduation. The week we send the denials is inevitably filled with emails and panicked phone calls telling us “they didn’t know about Requirement X” or “Advisor Y told me I was ‘all set.’” Telling a student they didn’t graduate because of missing one or more classes is the most difficult thing I’ve ever had to do in my career. I can see the betrayal my students feel at the hands of their advisors and the school, as they  are often at a complete loss about what to do. I’ve had students cry, yell, punch my desk, lose a work VISA or job opportunity, beg, and even try to make deals with me and my team.

Continue reading at: Advising to Graduation | ACPA

The Student Affairs Collective #SAVolunteers – The Secret Lives of Student Affairs Professionals – The Student Affairs Collective

In this time of giving, many people think of the needs of others and decide to volunteer at a food pantry, or with the elderly or children in need. Some people volunteer at specific times of the year, like during the holidays; others volunteer year-round with various organizations. Volunteering is a noble activity–giving of your time, energy, knowledge and skills to benefit others with no expectation of receiving back anything but a “Thank you” and a good feeling.  Yet, many volunteers DO expect something more, whether it’s professional connections, skills development, a sense of superiority, or something else entirely.

Continue reading at: The Student Affairs Collective #SAVolunteers – The Secret Lives of Student Affairs Professionals – The Student Affairs Collective

#SAFirstJobs–“Things might have been different, but they could not have been better. | This Side of Theory”

This has been the hardest contribution to a blog series I’ve written

July 21, 2011

“Yes, I’ll gladly accept the position, thank you so much for your consideration.”

“Start date? Well, my mother died 2 days ago…thank you…so I know that they want me to start ASAP, but I need some time to…yes, thank you…I can’t do anything before August 1. Thank you for your kindness, yes, I’ll be in touch with the department.”

Continue reading at: Things might have been different, but they could not have been better. | This Side of TheoryThis Side of Theory.

A Day in the Life of a Graduation Coordinator #dayinSA

What does my day look like?

As the Graduation Coordinator in the Registrar’s Office at UMass Boston, I manage all aspects of graduation (note, I did not say Commencement!) for Undergraduate and Graduate students. I report to one of the Associate Registrars, and have a team of three who help ensure the accuracy of student records, including degree audits, notes, transfer and test credits, and degree posting.

Continue reading at The Student Affairs Collective » A Day in the Life of a Graduation Coordinator #dayinSA.

#SAReflects–“Embracing the Wind”

One last re-blog from The Student Affairs Collaborative. This was my first contribution, reflecting on 2014.

To many people looking at the story of my life, 2014 wasn’t a phenomenally significant year—I didn’t move to a new institution; no changes occurred within the Registrar’s Office, or even at UMass Boston for that matter; my involvement in professional organizations maintains the status quo. Even my personal life has been fairly consistent.

Continue Reading at The Student Affairs Collective » #SAReflects Embracing the Wind.

#MySAPath–“Expecting the Unexpected”

It seems I like contributing to blog series, which I’m better at than keeping my own blog. This is another post to The Student Affairs Collaborative from January 2015 about my career path.

My student affairs path is not as neat as one might initially imagine. Some might even say I’m not quite on the same path as most other student affairs professionals. I guess only time will tell.

Keep reading at The Student Affairs Collective » #MySAPath – Expecting the Unexpected.

#SACommits–“Recognizing Myself”

I’ve contributed another post to the Student Affairs Collective blog, this time as part of #SACommits: a project reducing the stigma of mental illness by talking about it.

In 1994, I was a high school Freshman. My arms and wrists were covered in scratches and small cuts. I was convinced the world would be better off without me. I just wanted to go away, be alone, and not bother or be bothered by other people.

Keep reading at The Student Affairs Collective » #SACommits – Recognizing Myself.