Organize for Your Interview NOW

This afternoon, I posted a tweet which received a few “likes.”

tweet-120716

That tweet was in response to the third email of the day, 5th total in 2 days, a drop-in and a phone call from a student trying to figure out her graduation from August. The moment I hit “send,” I realized that THIS was the exact situation interviewers are looking for when they ask that question.

I don’t know about you, but when that question comes up in an interview, I panic because I tend to move beyond those difficult moments–they are just part of the job, and once passed, I stop worrying. Thus, I forget part of all of the details and have to scramble for an answer.

Maybe I’m just behind in the game, though, and this is news only to me.

What are your tips for organizing now for an interview process which may not present itself for some time?

Advising to Graduation | ACPA

Three times a year, the Graduation Team in the Registrar’s Office sends several hundred emails informing students that they did not meet the requirements for graduation. The week we send the denials is inevitably filled with emails and panicked phone calls telling us “they didn’t know about Requirement X” or “Advisor Y told me I was ‘all set.’” Telling a student they didn’t graduate because of missing one or more classes is the most difficult thing I’ve ever had to do in my career. I can see the betrayal my students feel at the hands of their advisors and the school, as they  are often at a complete loss about what to do. I’ve had students cry, yell, punch my desk, lose a work VISA or job opportunity, beg, and even try to make deals with me and my team.

Continue reading at: Advising to Graduation | ACPA

The Student Affairs Collective #SAVolunteers – The Secret Lives of Student Affairs Professionals – The Student Affairs Collective

In this time of giving, many people think of the needs of others and decide to volunteer at a food pantry, or with the elderly or children in need. Some people volunteer at specific times of the year, like during the holidays; others volunteer year-round with various organizations. Volunteering is a noble activity–giving of your time, energy, knowledge and skills to benefit others with no expectation of receiving back anything but a “Thank you” and a good feeling.  Yet, many volunteers DO expect something more, whether it’s professional connections, skills development, a sense of superiority, or something else entirely.

Continue reading at: The Student Affairs Collective #SAVolunteers – The Secret Lives of Student Affairs Professionals – The Student Affairs Collective

#SAFirstJobs–“Things might have been different, but they could not have been better. | This Side of Theory”

This has been the hardest contribution to a blog series I’ve written

July 21, 2011

“Yes, I’ll gladly accept the position, thank you so much for your consideration.”

“Start date? Well, my mother died 2 days ago…thank you…so I know that they want me to start ASAP, but I need some time to…yes, thank you…I can’t do anything before August 1. Thank you for your kindness, yes, I’ll be in touch with the department.”

Continue reading at: Things might have been different, but they could not have been better. | This Side of TheoryThis Side of Theory.

A Day in the Life of a Graduation Coordinator #dayinSA

What does my day look like?

As the Graduation Coordinator in the Registrar’s Office at UMass Boston, I manage all aspects of graduation (note, I did not say Commencement!) for Undergraduate and Graduate students. I report to one of the Associate Registrars, and have a team of three who help ensure the accuracy of student records, including degree audits, notes, transfer and test credits, and degree posting.

Continue reading at The Student Affairs Collective » A Day in the Life of a Graduation Coordinator #dayinSA.

#MySAPath–“Expecting the Unexpected”

It seems I like contributing to blog series, which I’m better at than keeping my own blog. This is another post to The Student Affairs Collaborative from January 2015 about my career path.

My student affairs path is not as neat as one might initially imagine. Some might even say I’m not quite on the same path as most other student affairs professionals. I guess only time will tell.

Keep reading at The Student Affairs Collective » #MySAPath – Expecting the Unexpected.

With a Little Bit of Help from my Network

Only once have I left a job for another: my first job out of undergrad, and no one expected me to stay long. I was in that second job for almost 5 years before returning to school for my M.S. As of last Friday, I have successfully completed a job search that took up the better part of the past year; I start at UMASS – Boston in a few weeks as Graduation Coordinator in the Registrar’s Office.

As I looked for my new job, I happily tweaked and re-tweaked my resume for each application, excited to show how my tasks and projects fit my potential new role. Inevitably, my resume became good enough, and my heart sank as I came to the next stage: THE COVER LETTER (read that in a deep, doomy voice).

I loathe cover letters. Maybe it’s my J, but really, why isn’t my resume good enough? Alright, I get it, but not enough to be happy about it. For this latest search, I reached out to @ceciliah & @ammamarfo, 2 women I respect for their professionalism and writing abilities, and asked them to review my letter. This was much more nerve-wracking than one might think–I have trouble asking for help, and KNEW it was terrible, so I felt I was bothering both of these people I respect personally and professionally. Both were gracious and incredibly helpful however, and garnered these replied from me:

“It’s funny how, as I read your comments/edits, I kept saying ‘wow, why didn’t I think of that?'”

“I think I’m too close & dis-enchanted to really make it sound like this job was special, which in turn makes me seem unspecial”

Then, THE INTERVIEWS

I’m always terrified to interview. My wife wishes she could interview for me because I’m terrible at talking to new people and am downright horrific about tooting my own horn. Thankfully, right before I began the round of post-house purchasing interviews, I read the most amazing and important bog post by AnneMarie Klotz:  The Things We Do Not Say…and Why It Hurts Our Profession. The first half of her post: Nailed It thanks to my coaches. I’m sure AnneMarie would provide a lot of feedback and critique if I were to practice interview with her, but I dug deep and found my truths, which I think helped me land this job.

Why am I making this post, and linking to all of these women? Because it illustrates a few things:

  • A Network is important: and a network does not necessarily mean in person. Almost all interaction I have with Amma is virtual; I have never met Annemarie in my life (I have the benefit of [currently] working in the same office as Cecilia). Following people on Twitter, or reading their blogs can actually influence your life for the better. Sometimes the help is direct, sometimes indirect, but be open to learning something
  • Ask for help: I will always struggle with this, but this experience has made strides in reminding me how important it is to get others’ opinions and ideas. I have a lot of trouble with group projects and collaborations, but in the right instances and with the right people, magic can happen
  • BE YOU: I admitted my struggles in the job search department to these women, and they embraced me and lifted me up. That encouraged me to be forthcoming in my interviews with my real weaknesses not those I thought the interviewer wanted to hear.
  • Pay it back/forward: I’ve since helped 2 people with their resumes, have offered to serve as a reference to 2 others, and will do so again if/when the opportunity arises. Networking is a big struggle for me, but small gestures cultivate relationships and empower both the giver and receiver.

How has your network benefited you in ways you didn’t expect? Have you actually used and/or cultivated your network?